International Services Group

Section 301 Tariffs on Chinese Products and Retaliatory Tariffs by China on U.S. Goods

Starting on July 6, 2018, the Trump administration has imposed a 25 percent ad valorem tariff on certain Chinese machinery and high-tech imports following an investigation pursuant to section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 (the “Section 301 Tariffs”). The United States Trade Representative (the “USTR”) has determined, as a result of that investigation, that China’s acts, policies, and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation are (i) unreasonable or discriminatory, and (ii) burden or restrict U.S. commerce. Read More ›

Section 232 Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum Imports

Starting on June 1, 2018, the Trump Administration has imposed a 25 percent tariff on steel and a 10 percent tariff on aluminum imports into the U.S. from all countries, except Argentina, Australia, Brazil, and South Korea. The exemption was granted to these four countries, as they agreed to quotas that prohibit any imports into the U.S. above certain specified levels.  Read More ›

Exemptions and Exclusions to the New Steel Tariff

Country-Based Exemptions

Earlier this month, Frost Brown Todd LLC published a legal update regarding the new 25 percent tariff on imported steel products, which went into effect on March 23, 2018. Under the original form of the presidential proclamation issued on March 8, 2018, the steel tariff would have applied to the importation of steel materials from any country except for Canada and Mexico. However, on March 22, 2018, President Trump  amended the proclamation by adding four more countries and one union to the country-wide exemption list. As a result, until May 1, 2018, the steel tariffs will not apply to imports from Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, the European Union, Mexico, and South Korea. Read More ›

President Trump Formally Orders Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum Imports

Last week, President Donald Trump formally imposed a 25 percent tariff on certain steel products and a 10 percent tariff on certain aluminum products imported into the United States from any country except for Canada and Mexico. These increased duties will go into effect on March 23, 2018. Read More ›

Sixth Round of NAFTA Talks Wraps Up with Some Progress

The sixth round of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) negotiations concluded in Montreal, Canada, on January 29, 2018. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer voiced subtle optimism that some progress was made by closing a chapter on anti-corruption and discussing other core issues, but expressed general dismay at slow progress and tough challenges that still lie ahead to strike a new deal. Read More ›

Trump Administration Releases NAFTA Renegotiating Objectives

On July 17, 2017, the Trump Administration released its most detailed and comprehensive list of objectives to date for renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). While this publication provides additional insight into the renegotiation goals of the Trump Administration, it does trigger a 30-day period before formal talks of NAFTA renegotiation among the United States, Mexico and Canada can officially begin. Such 30-day period will end on August 16, 2017, on which the first round of talks on the three-nation pact are scheduled to take place. Read More ›

Trump Administration Formally Triggers NAFTA Renegotiation

On May 18, 2017, the Trump Administration took its first formal step in delivering on President Trump’s much anticipated campaign promise to renegotiate the North America Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”). By formally notifying Congress of its plan to renegotiate NAFTA, the Administration has started the clock on a 90-day period, after which the United States can officially begin its NAFTA renegotiation talks with Canada and Mexico. Such 90-day period will end on August 16, 2017. Read More ›

Could President-Elect Trump Kill NAFTA?

During his campaign for presidency, President-elect Donald Trump frequently called the North American Free Trade Agreement “the worst trade deal in history.” He promised the American people that he would renegotiate or withdraw from NAFTA and raise tariffs on imports from Mexico and Canada. NAFTA is a free trade agreement signed by Canada, Mexico and the United States, creating a trilateral trade bloc in North America. In the aftermath of the election, Americans with international business interests may be wondering whether President-elect Trump has the legal authority to unilaterally withdraw the U.S. from NAFTA and how to prepare for that scenario.

Mr. Trump’s transition team has sketched out his plan for the first 200 days of his presidency. According to post-election memorandum and video, the president-elect intends to push for substantial changes to NAFTA and trade relations between the United States, Canada and Mexico. Read More ›

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Attorney Spotlight

Joseph J. Dehner Joe Dehner concentrates his practice on multinational business and securities disputes. He counsels a wide variety of companies, domestic and foreign, on issues confronting global business, including transnational investment, mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, customs and trade issues, international business structures, distribution and agency agreements and the resolution of international disputes.

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